Tag Archives: seminary

Theological Triage

 

So this has been written on quite a bit online, but I wanted to present this idea just so people who might not have heard it will have an understanding of importance of theological issues. Dr. Al Mohler, President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY, originally presented this in A Theology for the Church (edited by Dr. Daniel Akin, President of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, NC). In the conclusion, he wrote a chapter entitled The Pastor As Theologian where he presented the concept of Theological Triage. Many have heard the term triage in relation to a hospital’s emergency room. This is the process through which they determine the severity of injuries as they enter the ER and assign them accordingly (e.g. gunshots wounds are seen before sprained ankles). This same process can be brought to bear on theological issues. For example, disagreements on the freedom to drink alcohol is not as severe as disagreements on the deity of Christ. Continue reading

Repost: The Salvation of the ‘Little Ones’: Do Infants who Die Go to Heaven?

Drs. Akin and Mohler posted this a few years ago and I wanted to repost it. Hope it helps some people.

The Salvation of the ‘Little Ones’: Do Infants who Die Go to Heaven?
Thursday, July 16, 2009

by R. Albert Mohler, Jr. and Daniel L. Akin

The death of an infant or young child is profoundly heartbreaking – perhaps the greatest grief a parent is called to bear. For Christian parents, there is the sure knowledge that our sovereign and merciful God is in control, but there is also a pressing question: Is our baby in heaven?

This is a natural and unavoidable question, calling for our most careful and faithful biblical study and theological reflection. The unspeakable anguish of a parent?s heart demands our honest and humble searching of the Scriptures.

Some are quick to answer this question out of sentimentality. Of course infants go to heaven, they argue, for how could God refuse a precious little one? The Universalist has a quick answer, for he believes that everyone will go to heaven. Some persons may simply suggest that elect infants go to heaven, while the non-elect do not, and must suffer endless punishment. Each of these easy answers is unsatisfactory. Continue reading

Will work for, well, money

So, we’re getting settled in here in good ol’ GA. We’re in the Lawrenceville area hanging with my grandmother-in-law and aunt-in-law (whom I usually speak of as “my wife’s grandmother and aunt” since the alternative is a mouthful). I’m looking for jobs in the area, if anyone is interested. I have my portfolio here on the site, if you’re curious what I’ve done. The strange thing about looking for jobs is I have a very diverse skillset. For example:

  • I’m finishing up my Master of Divinity with Biblical Counseling from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, and would love to work in a church or a parachurch ministry giving counsel to people from the Bible.
  • I’ve been on staff and before that volunteering at Journey Church (and also working at my seminary) doing production stuff – video and audio editing, lighting programming, web, and all that sort of stuff. I love tech.
  • For over a decade, I’ve built websites (sometimes for fun, sometimes as a job or part of a job) and I would consider myself an advanced dabbler. Along with a friend, I’ve maintained a web host for a few years now.
  • Another area I love is making computers and tech stuff in general work. While in college, I actually was one of the first employees of the NGCSU Help Desk.

Diverse, huh? If anyone reading this knows of any jobs in the Atlanta (especially Northeast GA) area, please shoot me a note.

The Fall (Season)

So, classes have started back (although I’m doing them online), work is more hours, and I don’t really have any free time. That’s why this blog appears to be abandoned. I really just need to figure out a topic to blog on, and then just do it. Maybe suggestions would be helpful. I’ve been working a lot at Southeastern doing video production stuff. I’ve also been work a lot at Journey on HD upgrades (blu-ray specifically) and getting our new NW campus location up to spec before the grand opening on September 13th. So, questions or comments? Or maybe I should just post more ramblings and musings like this.

My Own Clarification

This might as well be considered a series. Don’t usually do that. However, Smooth posted a wrap-up to his posts that I’ve previously mentioned. I just want to respond to one point of his wrap-up.

Clarification #3: When I say that I’m done with the SBC, I mean that I’m done fighting for it and identifying with it. I don’t hate the convention. I don’t harbor any resentment towards the churches, church members, committee members, and Directors of Ph.D. studies, etc. who have intentionally marginalized me, belittled me, or treated me unfairly. Contrary to what Rev. Palmer may think, I can say with some certainty that you will never find me holding a position within the SBC. I don’t mean that I am against the SBC or think that they are evil as my good buddy John seems to think I mean. It may, however, be beyond saving. History will tell.

I think I wasn’t clear. I don’t think Smooth is against the SBC or thinks it’s evil. I meant he’s through with it (as he said) and many who say that they are through with it are counting it off as useless and others are evil. Smooth never has said that, but I’ve read it in quite a few blogs of people who have “jumped off the ledge” of leaving the SBC.

Journey still gives money to the Cooperative Program. As the senior leadership team here at Journey we decided to give to the Cooperative Program as a means of contributing to missions and supporting conservative theological training. We do not, however, identify ourselves as Southern Baptists, and you will not find any of us serving on this or that committee or going to this or that convention fighting for a voice. We just don’t care.

I am very glad Journey gives to the Cooperative Program. This finances my seminary education in two ways: first, a portion of CP funds goes to SBC seminaries, including Southeastern. Second, since I am a member of Journey – a church giving to the CP, I get a 50% tuition reduction. That’s stinkin’ awesome. While it saddens me that “We just don’t care” about having a voice in the convention, I know that’s not the case of all members of Journey, as I am a member of Journey who cares about turning the SBC around. I may be the only one, but that’s OK.

Why bother? Because of the missional impact the convention can have, you say? Again, I’m responsible for me. Maybe others are called to “save” the convention. But the reason that “young people are jumping ship by the thousands” and that Dr. Reid has to talk “good younger men off the ledge from leaving the SBC” is because saving the convention is not our calling.

I totally agree that we are responsible for ourselves. But one thing that I’ve learned at Journey is we are part of something bigger than ourselves. And while I also agree that the convention is not our calling, the convention, when course-corrected occasionally to line up better with God’s calling, could be used by God to help many people in many nations to know Him.

While Smooth and I may disagree regarding whether or not to have hope in the SBC, we are co-laborers in the Gospel at Journey and still somehow manage to get along. Heck, we’re even in the same small group!

And finally, lest you think this blog has become a blog about all things SBC and nothing else, I guarantee that my next post will mention absolutely nothing about that. It will probably be something theological or technical, since I love talking about that stuff. Politics? Not so much.